Mountains

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mountains, montañas, montagnes, montagnas

Hey ski resort. Let's talk about CO2

Hey ski resort. Let's talk about CO2

Hey, ski resort. I know we haven't seen much of each other for a few months but the mornings have been getting cooler and I was thinking about you. I want us to be together every winter, but we need to talk. I love the great times we've had together but we can't keep going on like we used to. We could talk about the weather all the time: When will it snow? How much? Will it be light, fluffy powder or a heavy, wet blanket of snow? But things have changed and I'm worried about our future. We need to talk about CO2 and climate change.

Mountain History on Wheels

Inspiration Point by Wende Cragg

We are well into the heat of summer in the Northern Hemisphere (I hope the skiing is great South of the Equator!) and warm weather mountain sports are in season. Heading to the mountains is a great way to escape the heat and find other ways of earning your turns. One of my favorites is Mountain Biking, just a whippersnapper compared to skiing, but it has been around since the early 1970's.

Dust in the Wind and on the Snow

San Juan Mountains snowpack

Dust Blows! Then dust lands on snow and the snow melts off faster. Why is this a problem? Faster snowmelt leads to early spring runoff and reduced river waterflow. Dust on mountain snowpacks amplifies the problem of warmer and drier weather in the Southwestern US brought on by climate change. What can be done about it? The Center for Snow & Avalanche Studies (CSAS) needs funding to research this dusty problem.

Don't Go it Alone

Backcountry, sidecountry, slackcountry. Call it whatever you like, it's skiable terrain that is not managed by a resort or patrol organization. Once you duck a rope, step through a gate or start skinning up a slope you are taking a risk with the snow you will slide down.

Operators are Standing By (for comments on TSV Master Plan)

TSV EIS Alternative 2 Partial Map

Slowly but surely the Taos Ski Valley 2010 Master Development Plan progresses. The Notice of Availability (NOA) for the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Taos Ski Valley's 2010 Master Development Plan - Phase 1 Projects was published in the Federal Register on January 13, 2012. A 45-day comment period began the day after the publication date of the NOA (the Comment Period ends February 27, 2012).

All.I.Can Comes to Santa Fe, NM

All.I.Can by Sherpas Cinema

Experience an Adrenaline-Filled and Thought Provoking Mountain Film on 01/31/12

WHAT: All.I.Can – an environmental ski film by Sherpas Cinema
WHEN: Tuesday, January 31, 7:00pm – One Show Only!
WHERE: Santa Fe Farmer's Market Pavilion, 1607 Paseo de Peralta, Santa Fe, NM
TICKETS: $10 at the door, $8 with a Winter Fiesta Adventure Pass

Humans Were Never Meant To Hibernate

Learn to Ski and Snowboard Month logo

January is a great time to head up the mountain and learn to ski or snowboard. With the holidays (SolstiChristmaHanukKwanzivus) past your local ski areas are a little less crowded and perfect for beginners. Maybe you have a son, daughter, nephew or niece who would love to try snow sports. Ski resorts across North America are offering great deals (and prizes) for beginning skiers and boarders.

Be True to Your Home Town Ski Hill

Snow Covered Deck at Pajarito Mountain

Thanksgiving has just past and many ski resorts have opened or will be spinning their lifts soon. Ski resorts with snowmaking or with good weather compete to see who can open their lifts first, often with only one run open. That friendly competition usually leaves out the smaller ski areas. Many town ski hills must wait for natural snowfall to cover their runs.

Let's Be Careful Out There

Ice Pack on Knee

Patience is a virtue, or so I have been told. Unfortunately, I don't always have much of this patience thing. Fresh snow has a powerful pull on skiers, and that can lead to skiing 'Early Season Conditions'. Early season conditions generally indicates rocks, trees and stumps poking through snow on the mountain. Perhaps it would be smart to stay on runs with better coverage or even wait for more snow to fall.

For now, I'll apply a little RICE and hopefully serve as an example (of some sort) to others.

 

First Snow

Early Snow on Raspberry Bush

I can't help it, I still get excited by a snow storm like when I was a kid. Few things hold the promise (to me) of waking to cloudy skies and cold winds. Winter is officially weeks away, but weather in the mountains turns cold and snowy well before the solstice. I love looking out the window at snow falling while drinking a hot cup of coffee. This first snow of the season will melt in town, but it holds promise of skiing to come in the mountains.

 
 
 
 
 
 

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